Etablissement Autorisé et Accrédité - Appelez nous aujourd'hui ! +212 661-776640|contact@adalia.ma
  • Revue de presse

    Truly mind-expanding… Ultra-topical… Harari’s big selling point [is] the ambition and breadth of his work, smashing together unexpected ideas into dazzling observations. (Guardian) There is surely no one alive who is better at explaining our world than Yuval Noah Harari - he is the lecturer we all wish we’d had at university. Reading this book, I must have interrupted my partner a hundred times to pass on fascinating things I’d just read. Harari has done it again - 21 Lessons is, simply put, a crucial book. (Adam Kay) Erudite, illuminating, vivid. [Harari’s] lessons suggest new ways of thinking about current problems… a splendid, sobering, stirring call to arms. (Sunday Times) Fascinating… compelling… [Harari] has teed up a crucial global conversation about how to take on the problems of the 21st century. (Bill Gates New York Times) The great thinker of our age. (The Times) Harari… is a rare voice of calm reassurance, slicing through the chaos and uncertainty of the modern age. (Allan Hunter Sunday Express) Harari thrills his readers because he addresses the biggest possible topics with confidence and brio. Compared with the subjects he tackles, anything else we might read looks piffling and parochial. (Evening Standard) Harari’s genius at weaving together insights from different disciplines, ranging from ancient history to neuroscience to philosophy to artificial intelligence, has enabled him to respond to the clamour to understand where we have come from and where we might be heading… 21 Lessons is lit up by flashes of intellectual adventure and literary verve. (Financial Times) Modern life can seem overwhelming. Fortunately, Yuval Noah Harari's new book, 21 Lessons for the 21st Century, is on hand to guide us through it. Poolside reading with purpose. (Elle) [Harari’s] purpose is to reveal the hard-learned lessons we have all already encountered this century… the persuasiveness of Harari’s philosophical analysis, and the engaging quality of his writing, is hard to deny. (Esquire)

    Biographie de l'auteur

    Yuval Noah Harari has a PhD in History from the University of Oxford and now lectures at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, specialising in world history. His two books, Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind and Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow, have become global bestsellers, with more than 12 million copies sold, and translations in more than forty-five languages.
  • Extrait

    1 ASSUME YOU KNOW On a cold January day, a forty-three-year-old man was sworn in as the chief executive of his country. By his side stood his predecessor, a famous general who, fifteen years earlier, had commanded his nation’s armed forces in a war that resulted in the defeat of Germany. The young leader was raised in the Roman Catholic faith. He spent the next fi ve hours watching parades in his honor and stayed up celebrating until three o’clock in the morning. You know who I’m describing, right?It’s January 30, 1933, and I’m describing Adolf Hitler and not, as most people would assume, John F. Kennedy. The point is, we make assumptions. We make assumptions about the world around us based on sometimes incomplete or false information. In this case, the information I offered was incomplete. Many of you were convinced that I was describing John F. Kennedy until I added one minor little detail: the date. This is important because our behavior is affected by our assumptions or our perceived truths. We make decisions based on what we think we know. It wasn’t too long ago that the majority of people believed the world was flat. This perceived truth impacted behavior. During this period, there was very little exploration. People feared that if they traveled too far they might fall off the edge of the earth. So for the most part they stayed put. It wasn’t until that minor detail was revealed—the world is round—that behaviors changed on a massive scale. Upon this discovery, societies began to traverse the planet. Trade routes were established; spices were traded. New ideas, like mathematics, were shared between societies which unleashed all kinds of innovations and advancements. The correction of a simple false assumption moved the human race forward. Now consider how organizations are formed and how decisions are made. Do we really know why some organizations succeed and why others don’t, or do we just assume? No matter your defi nition of success—hitting a target stock price, making a certain amount of money, meeting a revenue or profi t goal, getting a big promotion, starting your own company, feeding the poor, winning public office—how we go about achieving our goals is very similar. Some of us just wing it, but most of us try to at least gather some data so we can make educated decisions. Sometimes this gathering process is formal—like conducting polls or market research. And sometimes it’s informal, like asking our friends and colleagues for advice or looking back on our own personal experience to provide some perspective. Regardless of the process or the goals, we all want to make educated decisions. More importantly, we all want to make the right decisions. As we all know, however, not all decisions work out to be the right ones, regardless of the amount of data we collect. Sometimes the impact of those wrong decisions is minor, and sometimes it can be catastrophic. Whatever the result, we make decisions based on a perception of the world that may not, in fact, be completely accurate. Just as so many were certain that I was describing John F. Kennedy at the beginning of this section. You were certain you were right. You might even have bet money on it—a behavior based on an assumption. Certain, that is, until I offered that little detail of the date. Not only bad decisions are made on false assumptions. Sometimes when things go right, we think we know why, but do we really? That the result went the way you wanted does not mean you can repeat it over and over. I have a friend who invests some of his own money. Whenever he does well, it’s because of his brains and ability to pick the right stocks, at least according to him. But when he loses money, he always blames the market. I have no issue with either line of logic, but either his success and failure hinge upon his own prescience and blindness or they hinge upon good and bad luck. But it can’t be both. So how can we ensure that all our decisions will yield the best results for reasons that are fully within our control? Logic dictates that more information and data are key. And that’s exactly what we do. We read books, attend conferences, listen to podcasts and ask friends and colleagues—all with the purpose of finding out more so we can figure out what to do or how to act. The problem is, we’ve all been in situations in which we have all the data and get lots of good advice but things still don’t go quite right. Or maybe the impact lasted for only a short time, or something happened that we could not foresee. A quick note to all of you who correctly guessed Adolf Hitler at the beginning of the section: the details I gave are the same for both Hitler and John F. Kennedy, it could have been either. You have to be careful what you think you know. Assumptions, you see, even when based on sound research, can lead us astray. Intuitively we understand this. We understand that even with mountains of data and good advice, if things don’t go as expected, it’s probably because we missed one, sometimes small but vital detail. In these cases, we go back to all our sources, maybe seek out some new ones, and try to figure out what to do, and the whole process begins again. More data, however, doesn’t always help, especially if a flawed assumption set the whole process in motion in the fi rst place. There are other factors that must be considered, factors that exist outside of our rational, analytical, informationhungry brains. There are times in which we had no data or we chose to ignore the advice or information at hand and just went with our gut and things worked out just fine, sometimes even better than expected. This dance between gut and rational decision-making pretty much covers how we conduct business and even live our lives. We can continue to slice and dice all the options in every direction, but at the end of all the good advice and all the compelling evidence, we’re left where we started: how to explain or decide a course of action that yields a desired effect that is repeatable. How can we have 20/20 foresight? There is a wonderful story of a group of American car executives who went to Japan to see a Japanese assembly line. At the end of the line, the doors were put on the hinges, the same as in America. But something was missing. In the United States, a line worker would take a rubber mallet and tap the edges of the door to ensure that it fit perfectly. In Japan, that job didn’t seem to exist. Confused, the American auto executives asked at what point they made sure the door fit perfectly. Their Japanese guide looked at them and smiled sheepishly. “We make sure it fits when we design it.” In the Japanese auto plant, they didn’t examine the problem and accumulate data to figure out the best solution—they engineered the outcome they wanted from the beginning. If they didn’t achieve their desired outcome, they understood it was because of a decision they made at the start of the process. At the end of the day, the doors on the American-made and Japanese-made cars appeared to fit when each rolled off the assembly line. Except the Japanese didn’t need to employ someone to hammer doors, nor did they need to buy any mallets. More importantly, the Japanese doors are likely to last longer and maybe even be more structurally sound in an accident. All this for no other reason than they ensured the pieces fit from the start. What the American automakers did with their rubber mallets is a metaphor for how so many people and organizations lead. When faced with a result that doesn’t go according to plan, a series of perfectly effective short-term tactics are used until the desired out- come is achieved. But how structurally sound are those solutions? So many organizations function in a world of tangible goals and the mallets to achieve them. The ones that achieve more, the ones that get more out of fewer people and fewer resources, the ones with an outsized amount of infl uence, however, build products and companies and even recruit people that all fit based on the original intention. Even though the outcome may look the same, great leaders understand the value in the things we cannot see. Every instruction we give, every course of action we set, every result we desire, starts with the same thing: a decision. There are those who decide to manipulate the door to fit to achieve the desired result and there are those who start from somewhere very different. Though both courses of action may yield similar shortterm results, it is what we can’t see that makes long-term success more predictable for only one. The one that understood why the doors need to fit by design and not by default.

    Revue de presse

    Start with Why is one of the most useful and powerful books I have read in years. Simple and elegant, it shows us how leaders should lead.” -WILLIAM URY, coauthor of Getting to YesStart with Why fanned the flames inside me. This book can lead you to levels of excellence you never considered attainable.” -GENERAL CHUCK HORNER, air boss, Desert Storm “Each story will force you to see things from an entirely different perspective. A perspective that is nothing short of the truth.” -MOKHTAR LAMANI, former ambassador, special envoy to Iraq
  • Revue de presse

    L'objectif de ce livre est de vous permettre d'optimiser votre utilisation des médias sociaux. Nous partons du principe que vous connaissez les bases et que vous souhaitez faire un usage professionnel des médias sociaux, pour votre propre compte ou pour celui d'une entreprise. Que les choses soient claires, Peg et moi sommes sur le front des médias sociaux et non enfermés au siège d'une entreprise dans une "cellule de crise". Nous avons acquis nos connaissances à force d'expérimentation, d'efforts assidus, et non pas en pontifiant, en énonçant des sophismes ou en nous contentant de participer à des conférences. Il y a plus d'une centaine de conseils et d'astuces dans ce guide. Nous sommes des gens pragmatiques, ce livre ne contient donc que des conseils stratégiques et pratiques.

    Quatrième de couverture

    L'objectif de ce livre est de vous permettre d'optimiser votre utilisation des médias sociaux. Nous partons du principe que vous connaissez les bases et que vous souhaitez faire un usage professionnel des médias sociaux, pour votre propre compte ou pour celui d'une entreprise. Que les choses soient claires, Peg et moi sommes sur le front des médias sociaux et non enfermés au siège d'une entreprise dans une "cellule de crise". Nous avons acquis nos connaissances à force d'expérimentation, d'efforts assidus, et non pas en pontifiant, en énonçant des sophismes ou en nous contentant de participer à des conférences. Il y a plus d'une centaine de conseils et d'astuces dans ce guide. Nous sommes des gens pragmatiques, ce livre ne contient donc que des conseils stratégiques et pratiques.

    Biographie de l'auteur

    Guy Kawasaki est le chef évangéliste de Canva, un service de design en ligne, et membre exécutif de la Haas School of Business (Université de Californie à Berkeley). Auparavant, il a été chef évangéliste d'Apple et conseiller spécial de Motorola pour Google. Ses ouvrages les plus célèbres sont L'Art de se lancer et L'Art de l'enchantement. Rendez-vous sur : www.twitter.com/GuyKawasaki Peg Fitzpatrick est responsable de la stratégie sociale pour Canva. Elle a été le fer de lance de nombreuses campagnes de médias sociaux pour Motorola, Audi, Google et Virgin.
  • Revue de presse

    File this book under: NO EXCUSES. (Seth Godin, author of Purple Cow and Linchpin ) No matter what they tell you, an MBA is not essential. If you combine reading this book with actually trying stuff, you'll be far ahead in the business game. (Kevin Kelly, founding executive editor of Wired ) Few people know how to get things done better than Josh Kaufman. (David Allen, author of Getting Things Done ) Josh has synthesized the most important topics in business into a book that truly lives up to its title. It's rare to find complicated concepts explained with such clarity. Highly recommended. (Ben Casnocha, author of My Start-Up Life ) Fundamentals are fundamentals. Whether you're an entrepreneur or an executive at a Fortune 50 company, this book will help you succeed. (John Mang, Vice President, Procter & Gamble ) These concepts really work: I'm booked solid with clients, making eight times more money, feeling far less overwhelmed, and having a lot more fun. If you want to live up to our potential, you can't afford to miss this book. (Tim Grahl, Founder and CEO, Out:Think Group ) A creative, breakthrough approach to business education. I have an MBA from a top business school, and this book helped me understand business in a whole new way. (Ali Safavi, Executive Director of International Sales & Distribution, The Walt Disney Company )

    Biographie de l'auteur

    Josh Kaufman is an acclaimed blogger and consultant who helps people improve their business skills. He previously worked at Proctor & Gamble, where he was responsible for new product development and delivering in-store campaigns for key customers like Wal-Mart, Target, and Costco. Since 2005 Josh has been helping people learn about business without remortgaging their lives through his website, www.PersonalMBA.com
  • Lorsque John Chambers quitte ses fonctions de PDG en 2015, Cisco est devenu un géant de la haute technologie et pèse 47 milliards de dollars. De l’enfant dyslexique qu’il était à ses paris les plus audacieux au service de son entreprise, Chambers livre dans cet ouvrage ses leçons de leadership pour aider les jeunes entrepreneurs à devenir de grands leaders dans un monde connecté. Je pensais que les biographies étaient uniquement écrites après la mort d’une personnalité. Je n’aime pas me faire de compliments et je ne suis que trop conscient de mes faiblesses. Je sais aussi que tout ce que j’ai accompli dans ma vie, que ce soit vaincre la dyslexie ou bâtir Cisco, je l’ai fait grâce aux personnes qui m’entouraient. Durant vingt années, j’ai eu l’incroyable privilège de diriger une entreprise qui connecta les gens à l’Internet et qui bouleversa la façon dont le monde travaille, vit, joue et apprend. Je me considère comme un coach, comme un chef d’équipe et comme un consultant. J’adore enseigner. Ce qui me fit changer d’avis sur la nécessité d’écrire, ce n’était pas tant les leçons du passé que les opportunités pour l’avenir. Nous sommes à l’aube d’une révolution qui, non seulement amplifiera l’impact de l’Internet, mais se déroulera à un rythme beaucoup plus rapide que tous les autres bouleversements que nous avons vécus. D’ici à dix ans, quelque 500 milliards de voitures, de réfrigérateurs, de téléphones, de robots et d’autres appareils seront connectés. En tant qu’investisseur et consultant auprès de start-up dans le monde entier, je suis enthousiasmé par le potentiel qu’ont les nouvelles technologies de rallonger la durée de vie, de rendre l’existence plus sûre et d’apporter la prospérité partout dans le monde, mais aussi de créer des centaines de millions d’emplois. Mais je comprends aussi la peur que ces technologies engendrent, car ce bouleversement sera si brutal que plus de 40 % des entreprises actuelles auront disparu d’ici à dix ans. Les effets commencent déjà à se faire ressentir dans les mouvements politiques, les disparitions d’emplois et les modèles économiques défaillants. Pourtant, les individus qui se retrouvent en première ligne semblent complètement sourds aux répercussions de ces bouleversements et inconscients des risques qu’ils encourent.
  • Il y a vingt-cinq siècles, dans la Chine des «Royaumes Combattants», était rédigé le premier traité sur «l'art de la guerre». Pour atteindre la victoire, le stratège habile s'appuie sur sa puissance, mais plus encore le moral des hommes, les circonstances qui l'entourent et l'information dont il dispose. La guerre doit être remportée avant même d'avoir engagé le combat. Sun Tzu ne décrit pas les batailles grandioses et le fracas des épées, pas plus qu'il n'énumère des techniques vouées à l'obsolescence : L'Art de la guerre est un précieux traité de stratégie, un grand classique de la pensée politique, et une leçon de sagesse à l'usage des meneurs d'hommes. Autant que de courage, la victoire est affaire d'intelligence. Le texte de cette édition est établi et présenté par Samuel Griffith. Publiée en 1963 à l'université d'Oxford, cette version est celle qui a fait découvrir Sun Tzu à l'Occident et qui, par la richesse de son appareil critique (annotations, commentaires traditionnels, compléments historiques) demeure aujourd'hui encore la plus diffusée et la plus lue dans le monde entier.
  • Revue de presse

    “Mr. Vance tells the stories of both SpaceX and Tesla with intricacy and insight. . . . What does come through is a sense of legitimate wonder at what humans can accomplish when they aim high, and aim weird. (Dwight Garner, New York Times) “[T]his work will likely serve as the definitive account of a man whom so far we’ve seen mostly through caricature. By the final pages, too, any reader will sense the need to put comparisons to Steve Jobs aside. Give Musk credit. There is no one like him.” (New York Times Book Review) “[A] spirited and riveting biography.” (Wall Street Journal) “The SpaceX and Tesla founder certainly sees setbacks as an unavoidable part of innovation. But a brilliant new biography paints a picture of him as an obsessive, intolerant perfectionist.” (Financial Times) “Fascinating and superbly researched…” (The Guardian UK)

    Quatrième de couverture

    Elon Musk is the most daring entrepreneur of our time There are few industrialists in history who could match Elon Musk's relentless drive and ingenious vision. A modern alloy of Thomas Edison, Henry Ford, Howard Hughes, and Steve Jobs, Musk is the man behind PayPal, Tesla Motors, SpaceX, and SolarCity, each of which has sent shock waves throughout American business and industry. More than any other executive today, Musk has dedicated his energies and his own vast fortune to inventing a future that is as rich and far-reaching as a science fiction fantasy. In this lively, investigative account, veteran technology journalist Ashlee Vance offers an unprecedented look into the remarkable life and times of Silicon Valley's most audacious businessman. Written with exclusive access to Musk, his family, and his friends, the book traces his journey from his difficult upbringing in South Africa to his ascent to the pinnacle of the global business world. Vance spent more than fifty hours in conversation with Musk and interviewed close to three hundred people to tell the tumultuous stories of Musk's world-changing companies and to paint a portrait of a complex man who has renewed American industry and sparked new levels of innovation—all while making plenty of enemies along the way. In 1992, Elon Musk arrived in the United States as a ferociously driven immigrant bent on realizing his wildest dreams. Since then, Musk's roller-coaster life has brought him grave disappointments alongside massive successes. After being forced out of PayPal, fending off a life-threatening case of malaria, and dealing with the death of his infant son, Musk abandoned Silicon Valley for Los Angeles. He spent the next few years baffling his friends by blowing his entire fortune on rocket ships and electric cars. Cut to 2012, however, and Musk had mounted one of the greatest resurrections in business history: Tesla, SpaceX, and SolarCity had enjoyed unparalleled success, and Musk's net worth soared to more than $5 billion. At a time when many American companies are more interested in chasing easy money than in taking bold risks on radical new technology, Musk stands out as the only businessman with enough dynamism and vision to tackle—and even revolutionize—three industries at once. Vance makes the case that Musk's success heralds a return to the original ambition and invention that made America an economic and intellectual powerhouse. Elon Musk is a brilliant, penetrating examination of what Musk's career means for a technology industry undergoing dramatic change and offers a taste of what could be an incredible century ahead.

    Biographie de l'auteur

    Ashlee Vance is one of the most prominent writers on technology today. After spending several years reporting on Silicon Valley and technology for the New York Times, Vance went to Bloomberg Businessweek, where he has written dozens of cover and feature stories for the magazine on topics ranging from cyber espionage to DNA sequencing and space exploration.
  • In Steve Jobs: The Exclusive Biography, Isaacson provides an extraordinary account of Jobs' professional and personal life. Drawn from three years of exclusive and unprecedented interviews Isaacson has conducted with Jobs as well as extensive interviews with Jobs' family members and key colleagues from Apple and its competitors, Steve Jobs: The Exclusive Biography is the definitive portrait of the greatest innovator of his generation.
  • Good To Great

    450.00 د.م.

    Revue de presse

    ...the biggest selling and most influential management book of the new millennium. (Financial Times) ...seminal... (The Times) ...a must-read... (Management Today) Peppered with dozens of stories and examples from the great and not-so-great, Collins lays a well-reasoned roadmap to excellence that any organisation would do well to consider. Like Built to LastGood to Great is one of those books that managers and CEOs will be reading and rereading for years to come. (Amazon.co.uk Review) in this category (management books) there is nothing to touch Jim Collins... It is essential reading. (Sunday Times Business Books of the Year)

    Biographie de l'auteur

    Jim Collins is author or co-author of six books that have sold more than 10 million copies worldwide, including the bestsellers Good to GreatBuilt to Last, and How the Mighty Fall. Jim began his research and teaching career on the faculty at Stanford Graduate School of Business, where he received the Distinguished Teaching Award in 1992. He now operates a management laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, where he conducts research, teaches, and consults with executives from the corporate and social sectors. More about Jim and his works can be found at his e-teaching site, where he has assembled articles, audio clips, a recommended reading list, discussion guide, tools, and other information. The site is designed to be a place for students to study and learn: www.jimcollins.com
  • Extrait

    Extrait de la préface de Carlos Ghosn «L'innovation jugaad» : faire plus, avec moins. Réduire la complexité, éliminer le superflu, revenir à l'essence du produit. Donner vie à des produits concrets que les consommateurs veulent et dont ils ont besoin, sans tomber dans l'excès de sophistication... C'est ce que j'appelle «l'ingénierie frugale», un état d'esprit profondément ancré dans les économies émergentes, où être entrepreneur signifie transformer en opportunités l'adversité quotidienne. En Russie, en Inde, en Chine, et dans mon pays natal le Brésil, les chefs d'entreprises considèrent la rareté non comme un problème, mais comme la «mère de l'invention». En Chine, des ingénieurs développent des systèmes de surveillance des patients à faible revenu dans les hôpitaux ruraux : ils ont créé de simples bracelets-montres qui mesurent le taux de sucre dans le sang, l'arythmie cardiaque, le niveau de cholestérol ou d'autres maladies. Connectés à des bases de données partagées au niveau régional ou national, ces appareils permettraient d'économiser des milliards de dollars en dépenses de santé, et permettraient à des millions de Chinois de prévenir les conséquences dramatiques des maladies cardio-vasculaires ou du diabète. Si l'innovation frugale fait déjà une différence dans le domaine de la santé publique, 5 ans après le début de l'ère d'austérité initiée par la crise financière de 2008, l'idée fait également son chemin dans d'autres secteurs. L'industrie automobile a augmenté ses ventes de façon exponentielle dans les marchés émergents au cours de la dernière décennie. Les millions de personnes qui rejoignent les classes moyennes désirent en premier lieu acheter une voiture. Pour faire face à cette demande, certains constructeurs proposent des versions bon marché, à prestations réduites, de véhicules déjà développés pour leurs marchés traditionnels d'Europe de l'Ouest, d'Amérique du Nord et du Japon. Mais pourquoi des entrepreneurs de classe internationale et nouveaux leaders de notre monde globalisé devraient-ils se contenter de produits déjà amortis dans les pays occidentaux ? À l'heure où les marchés émergents sont en train de devenir le moteur de la croissance au XXIème siècle, les consommateurs indonésiens, mexicains, nigérians, sud-africains ou autres sont en droit de réclamer des véhicules adaptés à leurs besoins. Un dirigeant de petite entreprise dans la Russie profonde, où les températures peuvent atteindre les -30 °C, a besoin d'un véhicule qui sera différent de celui de l'ingénieur informatique en Inde, où l'infrastructure routière est en pleine évolution. Une voiture low cost pour les États-Unis peut sembler inabordable, si ce n'est complètement inadéquate, pour un jeune entrepreneur de Shanghai ou un promoteur immobilier engagé dans la course à la réussite à Rio de Janeiro. L'Alliance Renault-Nissan a adopté le principe de l'innovation frugale dès 1999, quand Renault a acquis le constructeur roumain Dacia. L'objectif était de construire une marque nouvelle à bas prix, pour l'Europe centrale et orientale. En 2004, Renault a dévoilé la Logan, qui s'est vite imposée parmi les meilleures ventes de la région. Nous avons depuis élargi la gamme, notamment avec Sandero en 2007, lancée tout d'abord sur le marché brésilien, et Duster, qui est devenu rapidement un succès sur tous les marchés où nous le commercialisons : Brésil, Russie, Inde. Depuis le début de la crise de 2008, ces voitures sont devenues des best-sellers, même dans les marchés dits «développés», notamment ceux frappés par la récession comme la France, l'Espagne, l'Italie, mais aussi en Allemagne.

    Revue de presse

    En français, l'innovation "jugaad" est traduite par "innovation frugale", celle dont l'objectif est de trouver des solutions radicalement nouvelles, mais économes en matières premières, en énergie. Bref, peu coûteuses... mais très astucieuses. Le livre que Navi Radjou cosigne avec Jaideep Prabhu, professeur à la Judge Business School de l'université de Cambridge (Royaume-Uni) - où M. Radjou enseignait précédemment - et Simone Ahuja, consultante spécialiste en innovation, explique les grands principes de ce nouveau mode de management de l'innovation. (Le Monde du 18 avril 2013 )

    Quatrième de couverture

    Jugaad : ce mot hindi populaire recouvre un concept que l'on pourrait traduire en français par "débrouillardise", soit improviser des solutions ingénieuses dans des conditions adverses (voire hostiles). Dotés de cet état d'esprit agile, les entrepreneurs en Inde - mais aussi en Chine, au Brésil ou en Afrique - parviennent à transformer les contraintes en opportunités et à "faire plus avec moins". Cette approche d'innovation frugale et flexible ne se limite plus aux économies émergentes. Dans ce livre, vous découvrirez les six principes de l'innovation Jugaad, ainsi que de nombreux exemples de mise en pratique de cet état d'esprit résilient et créatif dans le monde entier, dans différents secteurs d'activités. En France, certaines entreprises ont déjà opté pour cette démarche d'innovation nouvelle, et développé des solutions ingénieuses et génératrices de forte croissance : c'est le cas d'Accenture, Alcatel, Renault-Nissan, L'Oréal, Lafarge, Air Liquide, Saatchi & Saatchi + Duke et de la SNCF, dont nous avons interviewé les dirigeants pour l'édition française de ce livre. Les structures et processus industriels de l'après-guerre - gros budgets R&D, hiérarchies, etc. - ne sont plus complètement adaptés au monde complexe dans lequel nous vivons. Redevenons ingénieux ! Préface de Carlos Ghosn

    Biographie de l'auteur

    Navi Radjou, Français d'origine indienne, est consultant en innovation et leadership, basé dans la Silicon Valley. Membre du World Economic Forum, il est aussi co-auteur de From Smart To Wise. Jaideep Prabhu est professeur titulaire de la chaire Jawaharlal Nehru en business et management indien et directeur du Centre for India & Global Business à la Judge Business School de l'université de Cambridge. Simone Abuja a créé Blood Orange, cabinet de conseil en marketing et en stratégie basé à Minneapolis et à Mumbai et spécialisé en innovation dans les pays émergents.
  • Michael Watkins est un expert mondial des questions de transition professionnelle et spécialiste des problématiques de leadership et de négociation. Auparavant professeur à Harvard et à l'INSEAD, il est aujourd'hui consultant auprès de grands groupes et enseignant à l'IMD.
  • Simon Sinek est un expert reconnu du leadership, professeur à Columbia University. Auteur, speaker et consultant, son TED Talk How Great Leaders Inspire Action est l'un des plus regardés au monde. Il est aussi un contributeur régulier du New York Times, du Wall Street Journal et du Washington Post. En tant que consultant, ses clients sont variés, des membres du Congrès des États-Unis aux Pentagone, en incluant des petites entreprises. David Mead a d'abord été formateur en entreprise. En 2009, il a rejoint l'équipe de Start With Why. Aujourd'hui il donne des conférences et anime des séminaires visant à changer la perception du leadership et de la culture d'entreprise. Peter Docker a longtemps été pilote, puis officier de la Royal Air Force. Depuis qu'il a rejoint l'équipe Start With Why en 2011, il intervient auprès d'organisations du monde entier comme consultant et coach.
  • Olivier Roland est entrepreneur depuis l'âge de 19 ans, blogueur, Youtubeur, archéologue amateur, plongeur, pilote d'avion, globe-trotter et conférencier international, parmi ses nombreuses casquettes. Il est suivi, tous réseaux confondus, par plus de 450 000 fans convaincus par sa méthode !
  • Edward B Burger enseigne les mathématiques au Williams College et est aussi chroniqueur au Huffington Post. Michael Starbird enseigne les mathématiques à l'université du Texas, à Austin. Tous deux professeurs réputés, ils sont également consultants en entreprise et auteurs. Ils enseignent autant à des étudiants en formation initiale qu'à des adultes en formation continue.
  • David Evans est chef d’entreprise et conseille des plateformes  de taille mondiale ainsi que des start-up. Il préside également PYMNTS.com, une plateforme d’analyse de données multifaces qu’il a cofondée.
  • Misbehaving

    110.00 د.م.
    Richard H. Thaler, 72 ans, professeur à l'université de Chicago, est considéré, avec Daniel Kahneman, comme le pape de l'économie comportementale, vient d'être couronné par le prix à la mémoire d'Alfred Nobel (oct. 2017).
  • Quatrième de couverture

    Un grand classique du management accessible à tous

    Pour améliorer son travail, il faut d'abord bien le connaître et le comprendre. Henry Mintzberg apporte ici la réponse à la question clé : comment travaillent les managers ?

    Ce livre montre ce que font vraiment les cadres et les dirigeants dans leur travail de tous les jours. L'auteur a mené une vaste étude auprès de nombreux managers de tout niveau ; il a analysé leurs agendas et passé plusieurs journées à les suivre au quotidien en notant tout ce qu'ils faisaient. Henry Mintzberg dessine ainsi les traits de la fonction de dirigeant et distingue dix rôles essentiels autour desquels son travail s'articule (des rôles interpersonnels, des rôles liés à l'information et des rôles décisionnels). Mieux le dirigeant comprend son propre travail et se comprend lui-même, plus il sera sensible aux besoins de son organisation et meilleure sera sa performance. Cet ouvrage brillant est devenu un classique du management. Pour cette édition de poche, il a été complété par trois articles récents de l'auteur sur le même thème ("Un tour d'horizon des vraies fonctions du dirigeant", "Une journée avec un dirigeant", "Le yin et le yang du management").

    Biographie de l'auteur

    Henry Mintzberg, PH.D. (MIT), ingénieur (McGill), est professeur de management à l'université McGill de Montréal. Il compte parmi les experts des organisations les plus réputés dans le monde. Il est l'auteur de nombreux ouvrages de référence, dont Le manager au quotidien, Structure et dynamique des organisations, Le pouvoir dans les organisations et Pouvoir et gouvernement d'entreprise.
  • Un mot de l'auteur

    William Ury est directeur du Global Negotiation Project à l'université de Harvard, spécialisé dans les méthodes de négociations internationales pour le règlement des conflits armés et des problèmes globaux. Il est notamment l'auteur de Comment réussir une négociation et Comment négocier avec les gens difficiles. Ces deux seuls ouvrages (publiés au Seuil) se sont vendus à plus de six millions d'exemplaires dans le monde.

    Biographie de l'auteur

    William Ury est directeur du Global Negotiation Project à l'université de Harvard, spécialisé dans les méthodes de négociations internationales pour le règlement des conflits armés et des problèmes globaux. Il est notamment l'auteur de Comment réussir une négociation et Comment négocier avec les gens difficiles. Ces deux seuls ouvrages (publiés au Seuil) se sont vendus à plus de six millions d'exemplaires dans le monde.
  • Tout ce que l’entrepreneur débutant ou confirmé doit savoir pour créer et faire fructifier son entreprise. Conseils, techniques et secrets du succès: cet ouvrage pratique traite de tous les domaines et aborde toutes les étapes de la création d’entreprise.
  • Revue de presse

    Le Cercle Les Echos (Ils en ont parlé ) Je suis en train de le lire. C'est illustré de plein de cas concrets qui évitent bien des descriptions théoriques pour lesquelles il est parfois difficile de voir des applications porteuses.On a envie de s'appliquer rapidement à soi-même cette mine de bons conseils plein de bon sens. (L'avis d'un lecteur (Thierry Guichard) L'avis d'un lecteur (Thierry Guichard) )

    Biographie de l'auteur

    Chip Heath est professeur de psychosociologie des organisations à l'école de gestion de Stanford University. Dan Heath est conseiller en formation de dirigeants à Duke University. Il est cofondateur d'une maison d’édition de manuels universitaires, Thinkwell.

Titre

Aller en haut